Six SEO Experts on Twitter

by keif on June 30, 2009

I’ve been on twitter since sometime in 2008 (I assume, this is as far back as twitter is showing me).

In that time, I’ve added a ton of followers, and constantly sorting through the requests I’ve received. I don’t follow everyone. Particularly “Gurus” with thousands of following/followers. I don’t follow people who primarily use Twitterfeed so it’s just a stream of RSS posts. I don’t follow spammers (naturally) or people that do nothing except hock their site, their product(s) or their friend(s) similar products, and I especially do not follow self-claimed gurus, be it social media, seo, sem, etc.

The people I follow on twitter fall into a few categories:

  • I know them personally.
  • I know them professionally.
  • They are an understood expert in their field(s) like:
    • Web Development (Particularly Javascript Framework Developers)
    • SEO
    • SEM
    • Analytics
    • Social Media

Particular niches I subscribe to, and I have developed a small list of experts that I’d trust what they say (and occasionally toss questions to them). I consider this list to be “obvious” experts – they’ve proven themselves professionally, or have written at length in blogs about the topic.

My Obvious SEO Experts on Twitter

  1. Matt Cutts (from Google)
  2. Rand Fishkin (from SEO Moz)
  3. Aaron Wall (from SEOBook)
  4. SearchEngineLand (from itself)
  5. Jennifer Laycock (from Search Engine Guide)
  6. Mark Scholl (from EnginePoint Marketing)

I’ve limited the list to six – because I feel they cover a breadth of knowledge that you could gain, mainly from their blog postings – sometimes, 140 characters isn’t enough (some times it is).

I’ll work out additional “Obvious Twitter People to follow” in the future.

  • http://www.afhill.com Andrea Hill (afhill)

    I'm amused that the first tweet you get to is your calling me out on a twuck up! I tried to be helpful to go back and find an earlier tweet, and oddly enough, couldn't find the tweet you linked to.

    Evidently twitter's history feature has a 160 “page” limit, and because you've tweeted since you linked to that specific tweet, it's now fallen off your history as well.

    I saw it on your history, and then to validate, looked at mashable:
    http://twitter.com/mashable?page=160 vs http://twitter.com/mashable?page=161

    I wasn't aware of this limitation before, I'd be curious to know if that is a random number of pages, or if there is some logic behind it..

  • http://ikeif.net keif

    Yeah, ti didn't seem right, but I didn't take the time to validate the
    history (I know the first one wasn't the one I linked).
    It makes sense, I suppose that Twitter only saves 160 pages worth, it keeps
    the content fresh, and it never billed itself as “saving your tweets
    forever” but creates an interesting scenario if a service bills itself to
    store ALL your tweets, past, present, future.

  • http://www.afhill.com Andrea Hill (afhill)

    One of the first places I looked was myfirsttweet.com, but it reported an error. I don't know if someone would be able to tap into that twitter data unless twitter really let them.

    Also… does seeing a history of your tweets truly make sense, if twitter is intended to be “in the moment”?

  • http://www.redchery.com/ swasa

    Yeah Aaron wall and Matt cuts are some of the great experts in seo.

  • http://ikeif.net keif

    I get “too many tweets” – but I think that's just recognizing the 160 page
    limit from twitter, but the service doesn't want to admit it's own
    limitations.
    And I agree with the history of tweets not making sense… but I've always
    found it odd that twitter can't handle the amount of textual data in a
    better manner.

  • Pingback: Twitter – Niches, Not Follower Counts – iKeif – tech and social media geek, mootools fan, and a ton of links - iKeif - tech and social media geek, mootools fan, and a ton of links()

  • ravm

    Thanks for the cool list. Matt Cutts is spelled with two Ts.

  • http://ikeif.net keif

    D'oh, thanks ravm!

  • socialmaker

    When it comes to seo services there are only a handful of companies who really know what they're doing. Only these know what content is all about, fixing site issues, URL canonicalization and rewrites and getting you a lot of links.

Previous post:

Next post: